Wednesday, January 26, 2005

God-makers

ARNOLD O. ALDABA is a teacher, poet, PR officer, government worker, editor, film enthusiast and singer. He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Santo Tomas, where he finished an AB major in Literature, minor in Journalism “cum laude”. He has an MA in Communication Management from the Asian Institute of Journalism and Communication. Also a corporate communications officer, he does public relations and advertising work for Land Bank of the Philippines. His written works were previously published in Philippine Star, Philippine Graphic, Panorama, Kabayan, Philippine Free Press, Life Today and the Manila Times.

This poem reflects our religion and traditons. It criticizes our faith as something shallow to the depth of only idols and icons. We, humans, make our gods and by gods it could mean anything like money, fame, or power.

Gel Bonifacio
God-Makers
Arnold Aldaba
Parts pieced together, carved from wood and less heavy,
Gravitating and tilting eyes move uneven with bare hands
with chiseled skin from hard wood, faces lighten up.
While eyes pop and bulge, browsing in the front patios
of homes privately, body parts stacked on racks and shelves.
They last a hundred years down the road, heritage preserved
more than hundred years, and more. Hand woven, homespun,
and beads complete design and execution. Ages and ages, cuttings
are handed down. It is a secrecy and way of knowing what life is,
Misfits, miscast and outnumbered and alienated?
Water and earth blend, roll and reel off in a dousing of belief,
with chisels, hammers, nails honoring the hands, heads, bodies.
And the fabric of disbelief looms in captivity in golden halos.
The whole, the expanse moves unknowingly, for a vision,
that in a unfaith, they have come to terms, discovery.
The sacred icon by the crown moves in details.

Source: http://www.manilatimes.net/national/2003/jul/06/weekend/20030706wek7.html

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

This poem looks at religion as something shallow and the miracles are a product of the unbelievers and indenials minds.

vix said...

This poem reminds me of the Exodus story in the Bible when a golden calf was created by the Israelites. The reason behind this is that the poem is able to fabricate a sense of worldliness and avarice. There is no central image in this poem even though it talks about iconoclasm (as in the case of the Bible story, the prime image used was the golden calf). There is a rambling of worldly possessions, which in effect engulfs the reader into a state of perplexity. It is to be noted that in actuality, this is also what a person may feel if he strays from his religious beliefs and decides to follow a hedonistic lifestyle.

- Victoria Hernandez, R16

Anonymous said...

i believe the peom criticizes how much importance religious people have bestowed upon handicrafts such as statues of saints, different images of Jesus Christ, the rosary, and the like. The poem says that these things have become idols, created and preserved by lack of faith, or even absence of faith.

Anonymous said...

i believe the peom criticizes how much importance religious people have bestowed upon handicrafts such as statues of saints, different images of Jesus Christ, the rosary, and the like. The poem says that these things have become idols, created and preserved by lack of faith, or even absence of faith.

-luigi singson R16